The Tokyo Olympics Committee released the final logo for the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2020, following the withdrawal of their initial logo amidst plagiarism claims last year.

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The logo is called Harmonized Chequered Emblem and features a checkered pattern that form a circle. It was design by Asao Tokolo, a 46-year-old artist from the Tokyo Zokei University.

According to Tokolo, he was inspired by coloring pictures that everyone can add their color to. “White against indigo blue — it’s a very clean-cut expression. The games will also be held during summertime and I wanted to add some coolness into my design,” Tokolo said.

Creator of the winning design for the Tokyo 2020 games emblems Asao Tokolo, at Toranomon Hills on April 25, 2016. YOSHIAKI MIURA

Creator of the winning design for the Tokyo 2020 games emblems
Asao Tokolo, at Toranomon Hills on April 25, 2016. YOSHIAKI MIURA

 

The checkered patterns is known as ichimatsu moyo originating from the Edo period. The traditional Japanese colour of indigo blue expresses a “refined elegance and sophistication that exemplifies Japan.”

According to the committee, the logo incorporates the message of “unity in diversity.

“Composed of three varieties of rectangular shapes, the design represents different countries, cultures and ways of thinking. It also expresses that the Olympic and Paralympic Games seek to promote diversity as a platform to connect the world.”

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The logo was chosen from a shortlist of four logos. Tokolo’s design received 13 votes, while logo B had one, logo C two and logo D five. The winning logo was unanimously approved by the executive board.

The Logo Selection Committee subjected the logos to rigorous copyright checks, after allegations of plagiarism was made with their initial logo. Designer Kenjiro Sano has since denied the claim, but the similarity of his logo to Graphic designer Oliver Debie’s logo for Théâtre de Liège in Belgium.

They also asked opinions from the public this time. The committee received opinions from 39,712 members of the public online and an additional 1,804 comments written on postcards.

(Source: Japan Times)

 

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